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Technology has prompted unprecedented innovation and transformation in the media sector – Cambridge University Press is no exception [...]
Fri, Dec 19, 2014
Source: Computer Weekly News
An estimated 50% of home internet users are at risk from a bug affecting their routers [...]
Fri, Dec 19, 2014
Source: Computer Weekly News
Government chief scientific adviser publishes report on the internet of things, making several policy recommendations [...]
Fri, Dec 19, 2014
Source: Computer Weekly News
The price battle among commodity cloud players is set to rage on, but how much impact is it really having for enterprise customers? [...]
Fri, Dec 19, 2014
Source: Computer Weekly News
Mon, Dec 15, 2014
Source: MIT Tech Review - Web
People shop mostly on their desktop computers—but they live on their smartphones. For marketers, effectively reaching their target audiences requires making a connection between those two worlds. [...]
Mon, Dec 01, 2014
Source: MIT Tech Review - Web
If you use social networks to follow other people who share your first name, you’re not alone. The question is why.Back in 1985, a Belgian psychologist called Josef Nuttin began asking students to pick out their favourite letter from a pair or a group of three. To his surprise, he found that people were more likely to pick letters that appeared in their own name. So a Fred is more likely to pick an F than an M and a Jennifer more likely to pick a J than an L. [...]
Wed, Nov 26, 2014
Source: MIT Tech Review - Web
Data mining the way we use words is revealing the linguistic earthquakes that constantly change our language.In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy approached the eastern coast of the United States. At the same time, the English language was undergoing a small earthquake of its own. Just months before, the word “sandy” was an adjective meaning “covered in or consisting mostly of sand” or “having light yellowish brown color.” Almost overnight, this word gained an additional meaning as a proper noun for one of the costliest storms in U.S. history. [...]
Sun, Nov 23, 2014
Source: MIT Tech Review - Web